The Word Nerds Project: Findings from a Research-Practice Partnership Focused on Spelling Instruction[PDF] by Laura S. Tortorelli and Lori Bruner

This paper describes the ‘Word Nerds’ project, a research–practice partnership consisting of two researchers from a large public university and 17 elementary teachers in seven school districts in the United States. The collaboration was formed to study variation in instructional practice among teachers using the Words Their Way programme and address teacher-generated questions related to how children learn to spell words.

“When Students Perform at the Below Basic Level on the NAEP: What Does It Mean and What Can Educators Do?” [PDF] by Elfrieda H. Hiebert

When the National Assessment of Educational
Progress in Reading (NAEP) results are published
biennially, journalists and policymakers focus on
the approximately third of a fourth-grade cohort who fail
to attain the basic standard in reading comprehension. A
legitimate concern is that these students do not have the
literacy levels required for full participation in the global
digital world of the 21st century. However, the attributions
and claims of their literacy levels go far beyond this concern. . .

“In the Beginning: The Historical and Conceptual Genesis of the Gradual Release of Responsibility” by P. David Pearson, Mary B. McVee, and Lynn E. Shanahan. [PDF]

Educators are always in search of approaches that promote student development and academic achievement. Engaging learners in purposeful instruction in skills and strategies is a cornerstone in every classroom. The gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model requires the responsibility of learning to shift from being teacher-centric towards students gradually assuming responsibility as independent learners.

“What Does Discussion Add to Reading for Conceptual Learning?” by Pei-Yu Marian Pan, Brian W. Miller, and Richard C. Anderson. [PDF]

Prepared for teachers, school administrators, parents, and other members of the interested public, this summary of Marilyn Jager Adams’ “Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning about Print” selects from the complex and extensive body of research in the book to present a more direct but much less detailed account of
useful, research-based information on beginning reading.

“Beginning To Read: Thinking and Learning about Print” by Marilyn Jager Adams. A Summary by Steven A. Stahl et al. [PDF]

Prepared for teachers, school administrators, parents, and other members of the interested public, this summary of Marilyn Jager Adams’ “Beginning to Read: Thinking and Learning about Print” selects from the complex and extensive body of research in the book to present a more direct but much less detailed account of
useful, research-based information on beginning reading.